Board Visualization Test

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by Chess? on May 8th 2009, 11:29 pm

My question for all the participants of month 2 is, what did everyone think of the "Board Visualization" test?

A couple of things struck me as a little odd on the test. One, was it was called "First Month training" After completing the test, you were ether a master or not. No middle ground here! From my results, I am a long way from a master. But then again...I know that.
avatar
Chess?
National Master
National Master

Posts : 184
Join date : 2009-04-14
Location : canada, west coast

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by cofresi on May 11th 2009, 10:30 pm

I've been having a great time with the visualization tests.
In month 3 it gets intense pretty fast! Very nice exercise and like they say, you have to build into it little by little.

cofresi
Club Player
Club Player

Posts : 43
Join date : 2009-04-14

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by HangingKing on May 23rd 2009, 10:06 pm

Well, i've just discovered 2nd month and started with blinfold test and exercises.
I almost managed test A, but the knight travel is already too much for me, test B is simply not (yet) for me.

In fact i'm worried about the visualization learning, because blinfolded i more or less manage to answer the questions by algebric calculation, let say, a1 is black, so knight on b1 is white, it can go to b+1 1+2 = c3 or b+2 1+1 = d2, etc...
But i do not really see the image of the board like this, to be right, i can create mentally a local checkboard, but everytime i try to "enlarge" the view, it becomes fuzzy and i have to start again from the beginning of my calculations.

What's your experience (assuming you are beginner as i am at this ability) ?

__________________________________________
Never give up, never surrender.
avatar
HangingKing
International Master
International Master

Posts : 371
Join date : 2009-04-21

View user profile

Back to top Go down

re: Board Visualization Test

Post by Hank on May 23rd 2009, 10:40 pm

Hi,

I'm just a lurker (usually) here - haven't signed up for the ICS course (yet).

It's not really a true visualization technique, but I have a sort of cheating mnemonic/memory aid that I use when trying to remember if a given square is white or black. Basically I give a kind of numeric value to each square, and the squares with "odd" values are White and the squares with "even" values are Black. The way I calculate the value of the square is to covert the "coordinates" of the square into "odds" and "evens" and then add them. The "odd" files are a, c, e, and g; the "even" files are b, d, f, and h; the "odd" ranks are 1,3,5, and 7; the "even" ranks are 2, 4, 6, and 8. If you add an even file coordinate to an odd rank coordinate (e.g. for the square b1) or an odd rank coordinate to an even file coordinate (e.g. for the square a2) then the "result" of the calculation will be an "odd" number = a White square. So any combination "unlike" file and rank coordinates (even+odd or odd+even) represents a White square.

Conversely, any combination of "like" ("similar" or "matching") file and rank coordinates (even+even or odd+odd) is a Black square. This means that a1 and h8 are both black squares, since both a=odd and 1=odd, and since both h=even and 8=even. And again, e4 would have to be White (odd file, even rank), as would h3 (even file, odd rank).

So I guess the quickest formulation of the mnemonic is something like: "unlike" coordinates = White, "like" coordinates = Black?
Or: "unmatched" coordinates = White, "matching" coordinates = Black?

Or, more controversially, think of the recent Obama vs McCain presidential race, and you'll recall that "the White 'square' was no match..." Smile [just kidding]

-- Hank

Hank
Learning the Rules
Learning the Rules

Posts : 9
Join date : 2009-05-23

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by cofresi on May 24th 2009, 12:09 am

This is a pretty cool system. I had worked out something very similar but based on a combination of letters and numbers. I'll try this one too.

However, I find interesting that the author of the course made explicit instructions AGAINST these heuristics. I think in month 3, he warns NOT to use the a1 + 1, b1+1 ... method. Why not? He doesn't say.

But I think the reason is that the board must be visualized, and not just calculated with these formula. These heuristics do the job for you of telling you color of square, but that doesn't help you to "see" the board. I'm trying to work on "seeing" the board by other methods.

I'm putting the squares into a context, by seeing how pieces move onto the square or how they are connected to other squares. Example: I'll think about the e4 square on the long white diagonal, the bishop from g2 passing through the square, the pawn on d3 protecting the square, the knight on c3 defending the square. Or I'll think about the Queen from d8 to a5, checking the King and forking h5. These scenarios help visualize the board and think of piece-square combined.

It does take lots of practice as they said. But it gets a little easier each time.

Thanks for the heuristics --

cofresi
Club Player
Club Player

Posts : 43
Join date : 2009-04-14

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by HangingKing on May 24th 2009, 9:02 am

Yeah, this was my worry too.

Hank's method is fine, like any other algebric calculation i do, and i will use it at the beginning to help me. But for the moment it is the only way to get answers.

For example you told about the diagonal, i still have to think for a while (or use algebric) to determine how much squares there are between let say b3 and e6 ?

__________________________________________
Never give up, never surrender.
avatar
HangingKing
International Master
International Master

Posts : 371
Join date : 2009-04-21

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by chesstiger on May 26th 2009, 5:58 am

I just did test A and test B at the start of visualizationof month two. Test A wasn't that difficult, only a bit problems with the last question about the knight but with a little bit of thought that too was solved so test A result equaled 100%.

Test B was another cup of coffee. Trying to see the board was a nightmare but to my surprise i got 100% on it. All this without seeing the board in my mind, still counting the squares of diagnals (a3-b4-c5-d6-e7-f8) ... .

So acording ICS i am very advantaged in board visualization but in real time i actually suck at it. So instead of their suggestion of do some blindfolded games or go over games without using a board, ... i will just do those daily exercises they provide. Who knows, maybe by doing these i will (finally) get a real mental image of the board (+ pieces) in my mind to analyse on during actual gameplay so that my analysis will improve.


Last edited by chesstiger on May 26th 2009, 6:13 am; edited 1 time in total
avatar
chesstiger
National Master
National Master

Posts : 202
Join date : 2009-04-17
Age : 44
Location : Aarschot, Belgium

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by zmaster on December 26th 2009, 6:18 pm

To my surprise, I scored 100% on both the A & B board visualization test. In the past, I have done board visualization training but never with any consistency or much improvement. What I now realize from the ICS lecture, is that I must train consistently over a long period of time in order to see “real” improvement. My son and a good friend of mine both have much better board vision than me and can easily play a blindfolded game of chess. Both are 2300+ strength players, my friend is a FIDE Master. When I play blindfolded chess I get confused after about 20 moves. My FM friend is a big believer in visualization training. After 38 years of playing in chess tournaments, I feel a lot of my ability to see to board is from experience playing tournament chess. I stopped trying to play blind folded chess because it was “too hard” and require intense concentration for me to play. Now, I realized, that for me to improve I must do all the hard work that I have avoided in the past. I still have trouble seeing many variations and combinations beyond 5 moves. At the end of a long series of moves, it is very hard for me to see the board well enough to evaluate the position or see other candidate moves. In the past, I have been reluctant to do the hard work of visualizing long variation, now I will do the hard work to see those variations. I will practice the recommended exercises to improve my board vision. I am looking forward to see what a year of board visualization training will bring.

zmaster
Scholastic Player
Scholastic Player

Posts : 19
Join date : 2009-11-28

View user profile http://www.zebfortman.com

Back to top Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by Blue Devil Knight on January 1st 2010, 5:49 pm

Impressive, I didn't do so well on the test Smile

__________________________________________
http://chessconfessions.blogspot.com
avatar
Blue Devil Knight
Grandmaster
Grandmaster

Posts : 616
Join date : 2009-04-12

View user profile http://chessconfessions.blogspot.com

Back to top Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by Tweety on February 15th 2010, 10:10 am

I did the board visualization test a few days ago, I got a perfect score on both tests, however I am going to follow their recomendation as if I did them wrong. I believe a chessplayer should know the chessboard and chessmen as good as he can, after all they are our job tools and if we want to improve we should have better understanding of the battlefield and the warriors, it will make us good General.
avatar
Tweety
Club Player
Club Player

Posts : 65
Join date : 2009-12-23
Age : 49
Location : Valladolid - Spain

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by karpyan on June 7th 2010, 10:05 am

There's quite a lot of literature on visualisation around these days, but I haven't found anything else in terms of step by step exercises that deals with the development of visualisation from 'scratch' so effectively. I don't think its in doubt that knowing the board mentally is very beneficial - the habit of players like Svidler, Shirov and Ivanchuk calculating for significant parts of the game by looking away from the board has attracted a lot of attention. Tisdall ('Improve Your Chess Now') is good on this subject, but for a blindfold beginner like myself, his tests and examples are a stage too far. Tisdall uses the example of Alexander Beliavsky, who works through five games a day without using a board. If I remember, Lasker's Chess Manual also emphasises the importance of knowing the chessboard. Also, Wetzell's 'Chess Master at Any Age' has some interesting training ideas on visualisation/projection.

I have a feeling that this skill is extremely important, and I like that ICS has a step-by-step daily programme for improving it. That said, I'm only on Day 9 of the first month....

karpyan
Scholastic Player
Scholastic Player

Posts : 23
Join date : 2009-09-17

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by chesskang on February 8th 2011, 8:36 pm

Thanks for the headsup I started the vision drills on day 1...Of month 2
avatar
chesskang
Club Player
Club Player

Posts : 51
Join date : 2011-02-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by teckeon on March 28th 2011, 7:29 am

Something that may help us with visualization is an online tool. The online version is free.

http://chesseye.alexander-fleischer.de/o/#


teckeon
Learning the Rules
Learning the Rules

Posts : 1
Join date : 2009-08-11

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Board Visualization Test

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum